Two posters of the project results released at IHSED Reims 2018

In October 2018, BRAVE partners from VTI released two posters based on the project’s activities. It showcased the outcomes of the automated driving testing and surveys organized in Sweden, France and Slovenia.

Poster 1: Trust and acceptance of contemporary vehicle automation: a multi-country, on road assessment

Authors: 5 Alexander Eriksson, 1 Niklas Strand, 1 Solis-Marcos, Ignacio, 2 Anon, Florent, 3 Piperno, Alain, 4 Možina, Katarina, 1 Lindström, Anders

• 1Driver and Vehicle Group, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden
• 2MOV’EO, Paris, France
• 3UTAC CERAM, Linas, France
• 4Avto-moto zveza Slovenije, Ljubljana, Slovenia
• 5Institite of Transport Economics, Oslo, Norway

Motivation
Automated driving research involving drivers are often limited to drivers of one nation, or assess the experience of driving in a driving simulator. As part of the BRAVE research project we have conducted on-road testing with a number of vehicle types (Volvo S90 [2017], Mercedes S-Class and Tesla model X) in Sweden, Slovenia and France respectively. As this is an ongoing effort in assessing drivers’ trust in automated driving technology, preliminary results are presented from the abovementioned 3 countries whilst data is collected throughout the project partners.

Method
This research effort took place in 3 countries; Sweden, Slovenia and France, coordinated by VTI, Sweden. Therefore, the testing locations, and available vehicle differ somewhat.
The test took place on motorway road-infrastructure in each country, consisting of approximately 20 minutes of driving.
Prior to driving, participants received a manual of the vehicle, and its ADAS functionality and were asked to read through the manual thoroughly. Upon completion of reading the manual, they were asked to rate their a-priori trust scores to the described system using the SATI-scale. The same scale was then filled out after completing a drive using the system in motorway conditions.

Results
The results show variation in SATI ratings both a-priori, i.e. when reading the manual, indicating either regional, or brand related factors influencing trust.
Comparing the a-priori and posterior ratings of trust on the SATI sub-scales there is an increase in the understanding of the system for both the Swedish, and Slovenian test, albeit not for the French one. Additionally, perceived robustness and confidence increased substantially for the Swedish and Slovenian drivers, but the French drivers show a larger spread in most ratings of the tested system.

Acknowledgement
This work was carried out in the project BRAVE which has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 723021. The authors would like to acknowledge the work of fellow BRAVE project partners.

 

Poster 2: A Brief Report on Young Adults Views on Automated Driving

Authors: 1 Niklas Strand, 1 Alexander Eriksson
• 1Driver and Vehicle Group, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden

Motivation
An ongoing trend likely to continue is that automated driving systems are increasing and becoming an integral part of a modern road transport system. This will consequentially alter how the transport system is designed, as well as altering travel behaviors. Moreover, this trend will affect road users such as pedestrians, bicyclists, car drivers, passengers, and public transport users.
Young persons are likely to be affected by the automatization of the transport system for a long time and live through a radical paradigm shift in transportation. Therefore, their views are important for the development of the future transport system.

Method
In this study we sat down with five young adults in Sweden, of which three were men and two women, and discussed their views on automated driving.
The group interview was organized as a relaxed discussion with loose moderating based on ten open ended questions. A key feature of the questions that were used was that they were designed to nudge the participants to take on the perspective of different road users, or roles that they could find themselves in as users of the transport system (e.g. car driver, or pedestrian). During the interview emphasis was placed on the interplay between participants who, collectively, could outline the direction of the discussion.

Results
The results capture opinions, concerns, suggestions, and feelings about automated driving.
For instance, they had many opinions and expectations regarding the human-machine-interface (e.g. eHMIs, feedback and communication needs), but interestingly, they also touched upon ethical, juridical, and psychological aspects related with the introduction of automated driving systems.
The results suggest that young adults are aware of the complexity and efforts needed with the introduction of automated driving, yet they show acceptance towards it.

Acknowledgement
This work was carried out in the project BRAVE which has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 723021. The authors would like to acknowledge the work of project partners at VTI and IFES who were involved in the development of the methodology.

 

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